New Hampshire Humanities Awards $23,850 in Grants

Six nonprofit organizations were recently awarded Community Project Grants for fall and winter events in locations around the state. Information about these events will be publicized in our monthly e-news and online event calendar as details become available. Our grants are supported in part by the National Endowment for the Humanities.

Plains Speaking: Massacre, Facts and Fictions

Pontine Theatre will host a series of four events this fall exploring the history and legacy of an infamous native raid on colonial settlers at the Portsmouth Plain in 1696. Three talks and a history walk around the Great Bog will investigate actual events and their causes, the broader context of regional conflicts between European settlers and native peoples, and a Native American perspective on relations with early settlers.
www.pontine.org

2019 One Book One Valley Community Read

What is gender? Why does it matter? The 14th annual One Book One Valley community read this fall will be centered around the book Becoming Nicole: The Transformation of an American Family. Fifteen libraries and an independent bookstore will host a variety of lectures, films, book discussions, panels, and a visit by the author,  Amy Ellis Nutt, Pulitzer Prize-winning health and science writer for the Washington Post.
www.onebookonevalley.org

For Freedoms Exhibit and Town Hall Conversations at the Currier

Inspired by American artist Norman Rockwell’s paintings of Franklin D. Roosevelt’s Four Freedoms—freedom of speech, freedom of worship, freedom from want, and freedom from fear—the For Freedoms Federation uses art to encourage and deepen public explorations of freedom in the 21st century. While hosting a For Freedoms exhibit, the Currier Museum of Art will offer four free “Town Hall” events to inspire civic-minded conversations and prompt reflection about contemporary social issues and values. Topics include:
• Freedom from Fear: Immigration in the Live Free or Die State
• Freedom from Want: Destigmatizing Substance Use Disorder
• Freedom of Speech: What is Speech Without a Voice? Hearing Those with Visible and Invisible Disabilities
• Freedom of Worship: Sacred Spaces/Sacred Lands
www.currier.org/for-freedoms

Raising Awareness of NH’s Black History to Build Inclusive Communities Today

The Black Heritage Trail of New Hampshire will host three of its signature “Tea Talk” programs in new locations around the state, Keene, Plymouth, and Nashua. These dialogues act as a catalyst for deeper exploration of Black New Hampshire history, while examining the grip of racism on our past and its contemporary manifestations.
www.blackheritagetrailnh.org

Courage to Create: “Mending Broken Things”

Thursday, September 19, 2019, 7:00 pm 
Library Arts Center at Richards Library, 58 North Main Street, Newport

Taking a cue from his memoir, The Words I Chose, Wes McNair will give a combined poetry reading and talk titled “Mending Broken Things,” hosted by the Center for the Arts – Lake Sunapee Region. McNair is a multiple prize-winning poet, writer, editor, and professor, and Newport native widely respected and loved for his courage to not turn his back on the local obstacles to his success as a widely respected literary figure. Contact: Nancy Marashio, 763-4163

Democracy is Not a Spectator Sport

Thursday, October 3, 2019, 6:00 pm
Concord City Auditorium, 2 Prince Street 

New York Times bestselling author Kenneth C. Davis speaks about the vital role of social studies in safeguarding our rights. Author of the Don’t Know Much About© series, Davis will speak on the importance of schools offering dynamic social studies instruction and how the larger community plays an important role in promoting democratic ideals for the next generation. Immediately preceding Davis’s talk, New Hampshire Historical Society will provide a preview of the new curriculum “Moose on the Loose: Social Studies for Granite State Kids.” Free and open to the public. For pre-registration: edubrulle@nhhistory.org

To read about working with humanities scholars, designing your own event or project, and finding funding, explore our website, www.nhhumanities.org/grants. To host a New Hampshire Humanities information session for organizations in your area, contact Susan Hatem, Director of Programs and Grant Making, at shatem@nhhumanities.org.