Welcome!

All the events listed in this calendar are funded in whole or part by New Hampshire Humanities, and all are free and open to the public unless otherwise noted. Many of these events are Humanities to Go programs your organization can book, made possible in part by generous support from
 

 

View a PDF of our quarterly publication, the Winter 2019-2020 issue of Engage!

For previous editions of our newsletter, click here.

Our Humanities to Go Catalog is available online.

 

 
New Hampshire Humanities programs are made possible in part by a grant from the National Endowment for the Humanities (NEH). Any views, findings, conclusions or recommendations expressed in this these programs do not necessarily represent those of the NEH or New Hampshire Humanities.

Sunday, January 5, 2020

Tucker Free Library | Henniker, NH

The campaign for women's right to vote was a long one, from the 1848 Women's Rights Convention in Seneca Falls, New York to ratification of the 19th amendment in 1920. Who were the key players in New Hampshire and the nation? What issues and obstacles did they face? How did suffragists benefit from World War I in the final push for passage of the women's suffrage amendment? Who was left out when women got the right to vote? Using historic photos and documents, Liz Tentarelli will guide us on the journey.

Thursday, January 9, 2020

Rindge Meeting House | Rindge, NH

Through reflective conversation, book-making and writing inspired by Oliver’s art, participants can explore timeless questions about our relationship to nature and responsibility for the environment. 

In this session, Part 1 of a two-session program, participants will read and reflect on Mary Oliver’s poetry as a group with literature scholar and civic reflection facilitator Emily Archer.

Pre-registration requested. Register by emailing donna@ingallslibrary.com.

Lincoln Public Library | Lincoln, NH

The campaign for women's right to vote was a long one, from the 1848 Women's Rights Convention in Seneca Falls, New York to ratification of the 19th amendment in 1920. Who were the key players in New Hampshire and the nation? What issues and obstacles did they face? How did suffragists benefit from World War I in the final push for passage of the women's suffrage amendment? Who was left out when women got the right to vote? Using historic photos and documents, Liz Tentarelli will guide us on the journey.

Friday, January 10, 2020

Hooksett Public Library | Hooksett, NH

Everyone knows that there's "something about lighthouses" that gives them broad appeal, but their vital role in our history and culture is little appreciated. Our early nation was built on maritime economy, and lighthouses were part of the system that made that possible. Due to automation, traditional lighthouse keeping is a way of life that has faded into the past. Jeremy D'Entremont tells the history of New England's historic and picturesque lighthouses primarily focusing on the colorful and dramatic stories of lighthouse keepers and their families.

Saturday, January 11, 2020

Jaffrey Public Library | Jaffrey, NH

In the midst of New Hampshire's opioid crisis, we are far from the time when addiction was an unfamiliar and even taboo subject. Narratives of addiction and recovery have become their own genre, with familiar shapes and forms that reflect deep cultural ideas about morality, free will, and social responsibility. The popularity of such narratives has created opportunities for empathy and understanding; they have also fostered particular beliefs about how addiction and recovery work.

New Hampshire Historical Society | Concord, NH

Jennie Powers took a stand against social vices in New Hampshire and Vermont in the early twentieth century. She was a humane society agent in Keene from 1903-1936 and one of the first humane society agents to become a deputy sheriff in New Hampshire. Jennie was known across the country as “The Woman Who Dares” cited by the Boston Post newspaper in 1906 as having arrested more men than any other woman in America. As a photographic activist, she used her camera to document animal cruelty, family violence, and wide-spread poverty in New Hampshire’s Monadnock region and beyond.

Sunday, January 12, 2020

Nashua Public Library | Nashua, NH

The relationship between religion and race in America is complex. This panel of theologians will explore the relationship between church, race, and state and the role the church could play in healing the soul of the nation. 

Monday, January 13, 2020

Area 23 | Concord, NH

Join us for "Ideas on Tap," our bimonthly series of pint-sized conversations about big ideas. On Monday, January 13th, we'll host a community conversation about the cost of higher education. With student debt, contingent faculty, rising tuition, admissions scandals, and low unemployment rates, is a college education still worth it?

Stratham Fire Station | Stratham, NH

Drawing heavily on the repertoire of traditional singer Lena Bourne Fish (1873-1945) of Jaffrey and Temple, New Hampshire, Jeff Warner offers the songs and stories that, in the words of Carl Sandburg, tell us "where we came from and what brought us along." These ballads, love songs and comic pieces, reveal the experiences and emotions of daily life in the days before movies, sound recordings and, for some, books.

Tuesday, January 14, 2020

Lane Memorial Library | Hampton, NH

Join us in Hampton to hear some of the stories behind the three-part podcast series, "The Real Witches of New Hampshire," a collaboration between NHPR and New Hampshire Humanities. 

Wednesday, January 15, 2020

Pease Public Library | Plymouth, NH

Through traditional music Jordan Tirrell-Wysocki relays some of the adventures, misadventures, and emotions experienced by Irish emigrants. The focus is on songs about leaving Ireland, sometimes focusing on the reasons for leaving (a man who is driven from his land by English persecution), sometimes revealing what happened upon arrival (an immigrant drafted into the Union army during the Civil War), and sometimes exploring the universal feeling of homesickness of a stranger in a strange land (a factory worker in London missing his home in County Clare).

Bartlett Elementary School | Bartlett, NH

This program presents a brief history of the New Hampshire Presidential Primary, from its origins during the Progressive era of the early twentieth century, through its evolution to the most important step toward being elected President of the United States. Based around segments from the documentary "The Premier Primary, New Hampshire and Presidential Elections" this program focuses on several memorable moments such as Senator Muskie crying in front of the Union Leader office, and who paid for Ronald Reagan's microphone.

Sunday, January 19, 2020

Rodgers Memorial Library | Hudson, NH

This program presents a brief history of the New Hampshire Presidential Primary, from its origins during the Progressive era of the early twentieth century, through its evolution to the most important step toward being elected President of the United States. Based around segments from the documentary "The Premier Primary, New Hampshire and Presidential Elections" this program focuses on several memorable moments such as Senator Muskie crying in front of the Union Leader office, and who paid for Ronald Reagan's microphone.

Monday, January 20, 2020

Currier Museum of Art | Manchester, NH

Join the Currier Museum of Art and New Hampshire Humanities for a town hall that considers the varied forms that artistic expression can take with the goal of starting a deeper conversation about accessibility in the arts.

Hooksett Library | Hooksett, NH

From Brooklyn to Boston, from World War II to the present, Jason Sokol traces the modern history of race and politics in the Northeast. Why did white fans come out to support Jackie Robinson as he broke baseball's color barrier in 1947 even as Brooklyn's blacks were shunted into segregated neighborhoods? How was African-American politician Ed Brooke of Massachusetts, who won a Senate seat in 1966, undone by the resistance to desegregation busing in Boston?

Thursday, January 23, 2020

Hanover Friends Meeting House | Hanover, NH

What is sustainability? And how has American literature shaped our understanding of this concept, in ways both surprising and disturbing? This interactive program begins with a discussion of current ideas about sustainability. Then, we will go back in time to examine Thomas Jefferson's vision of American agricultural abundance, which he contrasted with an overpopulated and under-resourced Europe.

Brookline Public Library | Brookline, NH

This program presents a brief history of the New Hampshire Presidential Primary, from its origins during the Progressive era of the early twentieth century, through its evolution to the most important step toward being elected President of the United States. Based around segments from the documentary "The Premier Primary, New Hampshire and Presidential Elections" this program focuses on several memorable moments such as Senator Muskie crying in front of the Union Leader office, and who paid for Ronald Reagan's microphone.

Saturday, January 25, 2020

Errol Town Hall | Errol, NH

This program looks at how dog sledding developed in New Hampshire and how the Chinook played a major role in this story. Explaining how man and his relationship with dogs won out over machines on several famous polar expeditions, Bob Cottrell covers the history of Arthur Walden and his Chinooks, the State Dog of New Hampshire. NOTE: Homemade soups will be available at the Errol Town Hall at 12pm with program to follow at 1pm.

Pembroke Town Library | Pembroke, NH

Why are we so fascinated with stone walls? Kevin Gardner, author of The Granite Kiss, explains how and why New England came to acquire its thousands of miles of stone walls, the ways in which they and other dry stone structures were built, how their styles emerged and changed over time and their significance to the famous New England landscape. Along the way, Kevin occupies himself building a miniature wall or walls on a tabletop, using tiny stones from a five-gallon bucket.

Sunday, January 26, 2020

Pinkerton Academy | Derry, NH

On January 26, 2020, the New Hampshire Institute for Civics Education will screen To Kill a Mockingbird as part of a multi-year statewide program designed to foster conversations with the public on law, justice, and civics. The screening and post-movie discussion will take place at Pinkerton Academy’s Stockbridge Theatre, Derry, New Hampshire, from 1:00 p.m. to 5:00 p.m. (program will begin promptly at 1:00 p.m.; please arrive by 12:30 p.m. to sign in).  Light snacks will be provided. 

Amherst Congregational Church Sanctuary | Amherst, NH

Drawing heavily on the repertoire of traditional singer Lena Bourne Fish (1873-1945) of Jaffrey and Temple, New Hampshire, Jeff Warner offers the songs and stories that, in the words of Carl Sandburg, tell us "where we came from and what brought us along." These ballads, love songs and comic pieces, reveal the experiences and emotions of daily life in the days before movies, sound recordings and, for some, books.

Tuesday, January 28, 2020

New Ipswich Library | New Ipswich, NH

The campaign for women's right to vote was a long one, from the 1848 Women's Rights Convention in Seneca Falls, New York to ratification of the 19th amendment in 1920. Who were the key players in New Hampshire and the nation? What issues and obstacles did they face? How did suffragists benefit from World War I in the final push for passage of the women's suffrage amendment? Who was left out when women got the right to vote? Using historic photos and documents, Liz Tentarelli will guide us on the journey.

Wednesday, January 29, 2020

Veterans Hall | Newbury, NH

The campaign for women's right to vote was a long one, from the 1848 Women's Rights Convention in Seneca Falls, New York to ratification of the 19th amendment in 1920. Who were the key players in New Hampshire and the nation? What issues and obstacles did they face? How did suffragists benefit from World War I in the final push for passage of the women's suffrage amendment? Who was left out when women got the right to vote? Using historic photos and documents, Liz Tentarelli will guide us on the journey.

Madbury Public Library | Madbury, NH

This program presents a brief history of the New Hampshire Presidential Primary, from its origins during the Progressive era of the early twentieth century, through its evolution to the most important step toward being elected President of the United States. Based around segments from the documentary "The Premier Primary, New Hampshire and Presidential Elections" this program focuses on several memorable moments such as Senator Muskie crying in front of the Union Leader office, and who paid for Ronald Reagan's microphone.