Welcome!

All the events listed in this calendar are funded in whole or part by New Hampshire Humanities, and all are free and open to the public unless otherwise noted. Many of these events are Humanities to Go programs your organization can book, made possible in part by generous support from
 

 

View a PDF of our quarterly publication, the Summer 2019 issue of Engage!

For previous editions of our newsletter, click here.

Our Humanities to Go Catalog is available online.

Thursday, August 1, 2019

Meredith Public Library | Meredith, NH

The Starry Messenger, presented by Michael Francis, is a dramatic fun-filled adaptation of Galileo's short treatise "Siderius Nuncius." Galileo (dressed in 17th-century costume) arrives to present a public lecture on his most recent discoveries made using his newly-devised spyglass. As he describes those discoveries, Galileo's new method of observation and measurement of nature become apparent. Throughout the presentation audience members are actively involved in experiments and demonstrations. After the lecture, Galileo answers questions about his experiments, his life, and his times.

Friday, August 2, 2019

Heberton Hall, Keene Public Library | Keene, NH

Keene Chautauqua 2019 features performances of two inventors, Nikola Tesla (1856-1943) and Hedy Lamarr (1914–2000), by living history presenters Douglas Mishler and Judith Kalaora.

Pavilion at The Fells | Newbury, NH

A screening of the documentary film “American Experience: Panama Canal” on a summer evening in The Fells new open-air Pavilion. This 90-minute film focuses mostly on the building of the Panama Canal and gives context to the significance of the United States’ emergence as a global power.

Monday, August 5, 2019

NH Veterans Home | Tilton, NH

On February 18, 1952, an astonishing maritime event began when a ferocious nor'easter split in half a 500-foot long oil tanker, the Pendleton, approximately one mile off the coast of Cape Cod, Massachusetts. Incredibly, just twenty miles away, a second oil tanker, the Fort Mercer, also split in half. On both tankers men were trapped on the severed bows and sterns, and all four sections were sinking in 60-foot seas. Thus began a life and death drama of survival, heroism, and a series of tragic mistakes.

Tuesday, August 6, 2019

Court Street Arts @ Alumni Hall | Haverhill, NH

Michael Tougias takes the audience on a historic journey as the Colonists and Native Americans fought for control of New England from the Pilgrims' first arrival to the closing days of the French and Indian Wars. Using slides of maps, battle sites, roadside history, and period drawings, Tougias covers the Pequot War, King Philip's War, and the French and Indian Wars.  Strategies of the Natives and Colonial raids are all featured. These include Rogers Rangers' raid on the St.

Lake Sunapee Protective Association | Sunapee, NH

Why are we so fascinated with stone walls? Kevin Gardner, author of The Granite Kiss, explains how and why New England came to acquire its thousands of miles of stone walls, the ways in which they and other dry stone structures were built, how their styles emerged and changed over time and their significance to the famous New England landscape. Along the way, Kevin occupies himself building a miniature wall or walls on a tabletop, using tiny stones from a five-gallon bucket.

Wednesday, August 7, 2019

The Center at Eastman, Draper Room | Grantham, NH

Anyone who ever posted a Gone Fishin' sign on the door during business hours will appreciate this native fisherman's glimpse into the habits, rituals, and lore of some of the more colorful members of the not-so-exclusive "Liars' Club." Hal Lyon shares tales, secrets, folklore, and history of fishing in New Hampshire's big lakes especially Lake Winnipesaukee which translates into "Smile of the Great Spirit."

Thursday, August 8, 2019

Pavilion at The Fells | Newbury, NH

Hugh Dubrulle, History Professor at Saint Anselm College, returns to The Fells to present a lecture on the relationship between the UK and the US, made complicated and challenging by the American Civil War. This is less about John Hay and more about how the two nations learned about each other in the context of Anglo-American diplomacy. This topic falls right in the center of Dubrulle’s long-term research.

Saturday, August 10, 2019

First Free Will Baptist Church | North Sutton, NH

Rubbings, photographs, and slides illustrate the rich variety of gravestones to be found in our own neighborhoods, but they also tell long-forgotten stories of such historical events as the Great Awakening, the Throat Distemper epidemic, and the American Revolution. Find out more about these deeply personal works of art and the craftsmen who carved them with Glenn Knoblock, and learn how to read the stone "pages" that give insight into the vast genealogical book of New Hampshire.

Monday, August 12, 2019

Boscawen Public Library | Boscawen, NH

Marina Forbes shares many examples of Matroyshka nested dolls, including examples of her own work and from her extensive collection, as she examines the rich folk tradition and symbolism of the dolls' appearance. She explores the link between doll making and other traditional Russian art forms. There will be a quick stop at the 1900 World's Fair in Paris that made Russian nested dolls and Fabergé eggs famous, followed by an illustrated tour of a working doll-making factory in rural Russia.

Tuesday, August 13, 2019

Manchester Community College | Manchester, NH

This is a workshop we’ve long wanted to offer, since our Connections program features many picture books on universal themes of the humanities. Jeannine Atkins, author and instructor at the Eric Carle Museum, will guide us on a journey of discovery about these works of art and story.  

Wednesday, August 14, 2019

White Rock Senior Living | Bow, NH

Stories speak to us of community. They hold our history and reflect our identity. Rebecca Rule has made it her mission over the last 20 years to collect stories of New Hampshire, especially those that reflect what's special about this rocky old place. She'll tell some of those stories - her favorites are the funny ones - and invite audience members to contribute a few stories of their own.

Moultonborough Public Library | Moultonborough, NH

Why are we so fascinated with stone walls? Kevin Gardner, author of The Granite Kiss, explains how and why New England came to acquire its thousands of miles of stone walls, the ways in which they and other dry stone structures were built, how their styles emerged and changed over time and their significance to the famous New England landscape. Along the way, Kevin occupies himself building a miniature wall or walls on a tabletop, using tiny stones from a five-gallon bucket.  

 

Thursday, August 15, 2019

Wilmot Public Library | Wilmot, NH

The Starry Messenger, presented by Michael Francis, is a dramatic fun-filled adaptation of Galileo's short treatise "Siderius Nuncius." Galileo (dressed in 17th-century costume) arrives to present a public lecture on his most recent discoveries made using his newly-devised spyglass. As he describes those discoveries, Galileo's new method of observation and measurement of nature become apparent. Throughout the presentation audience members are actively involved in experiments and demonstrations.

Hopkinton Historical Society | Hopkinton, NH

Until recently, the only known account of the capture by Indians of Abraham Kimball (1742-1828), “the first male white child born in Hopkinton,” came from second-hand information gathered by Alonzo J. Fogg in the 1870s which was published in 1880 in the Hopkinton Times and in 1890 in C.C Lord’s Life and Times in Hopkinton, N.H. However, discovered a short time ago at the NH State Archives is a letter in essence dictated by Abraham Kimball himself in 1823 on just this topic. Local historian Steve Thomas will share this letter and follow Kimball’s captive footsteps.

 
Weeks State Park Summit Lodge | Lancaster, NH

Architectural historian Bryant Tolles, Jr. shares the history and architecture of the grand resort hotel phenomenon and hospitality tourism in the White Mountains of New Hampshire from the pre-Civil War era to the present. The primary focus is on the surviving grand resort hotels: The Mount Washington Resort, the Mountain View Grand, the Balsams, the Eagle Mountain House, and Wentworth Hall and Cottages. Extensive illustrations document these buildings and others no longer in existence.

Third Congregational Church | Alstead, NH

Carrie Brown explores the technological triumph that helped save the Union and then transformed the nation. During the Civil War, northern industry produced a million and a half rifles, along with tens of thousands of pistols and carbines. How did the North produce all of those weapons? The answer lies in new machinery and methods for producing guns with interchangeable parts. Once the system of mass production had been tested and perfected, what happened after the war? In the period from 1870 to 1910 new factory technology and new print media fueled the development of mass consumerism.

Friday, August 16, 2019

John Hay Classroom in the Gatehouse at The Fells | Newbury, NH

Dorothy Rogers Mayhew, a member of the U.S. Department of State and an instructor at the Foreign Policy Institute, will lead a class in basic diplomacy skills with a particular focus on how to apply these skills in our lives as citizens. Ms. Rogers is a seasoned Foreign Service official, having served as the Consular and Economic Officer in nation of Georgia and then, as sole Economic Officer in the American Embassy in New Zealand. She is currently an instructor for the State Department’s Foreign Policy Institute in Washington DC.

Robinwood Farm Barn | Dublin, NH

Stories speak to us of community. They hold our history and reflect our identity. Rebecca Rule has made it her mission over the last 20 years to collect stories of New Hampshire, especially those that reflect what's special about this rocky old place. She'll tell some of those stories - her favorites are the funny ones - and invite audience members to contribute a few stories of their own. NOTE: The Dublin Historical Society Annual Meeting will be held at 6:00 PM with presentation to begin at 6:15 PM.

Saturday, August 17, 2019

Salisbury Free Library | Salisbury, NH

Why are we so fascinated with stone walls? Kevin Gardner, author of The Granite Kiss, explains how and why New England came to acquire its thousands of miles of stone walls, the ways in which they and other dry stone structures were built, how their styles emerged and changed over time and their significance to the famous New England landscape. Along the way, Kevin occupies himself building a miniature wall or walls on a tabletop, using tiny stones from a five-gallon bucket.

Tuesday, August 20, 2019

Ashland Railroad Station Museum | Ashland, NH

Whatever did New Englanders do on long winter evenings before cable, satellite and the internet? In the decades before and after the Civil War, our rural ancestors used to create neighborhood events to improve their minds. Community members male and female would compose and read aloud homegrown, handwritten literary "newspapers" full of keen verbal wit.

Dover Public Library | Dover, NH

Visually explore the tremendous legacy of New Hampshire's architecture from the Victorian period (1820 - 1914). This program looks at exuberant Victorian-era architecture across the state in houses, hotels, mills, city halls, courthouses, and churches, with references to gardens, furniture, and other elements of the built environment. Richard Guy Wilson explores elements of visual literacy and points out how architecture can reflect the cultural and civic values of its time and place.

Madison Library Chick Room | Madison, NH

This program offers a fun and engaging look at the historic and unusual weathervanes found on New Hampshire's churches, town halls, and other public buildings from earliest times down to the present. Highlighted by the visual presentation of a sampling of the vanes found throughout the state, Glenn Knoblock's program will trace the history of weathervanes, their practical use and interesting symbolism, as well as their varied types and methods of manufacture and evolution from practical weather instrument to architectural embellishment.

Gilman Library | Alton, NH

Anyone who ever posted a Gone Fishin' sign on the door during business hours will appreciate this native fisherman's glimpse into the habits, rituals, and lore of some of the more colorful members of the not-so-exclusive "Liars' Club." Hal Lyon shares tales, secrets, folklore, and history of fishing in New Hampshire's big lakes especially Lake Winnipesaukee which translates into "Smile of the Great Spirit."

Wednesday, August 21, 2019

Freedom Town Hall | Freedom, NH

Telling personal and family stories is fun - and much more. Storytelling connects strangers, strengthens links between generations, and gives children the self-knowledge to carry them through hard times. Knowledge of family history has even been linked to better teen behavior and mental health. In this active and interactive program, storyteller Jo Radner shares foolproof ways to mine memories and interview relatives for meaningful stories. Participants practices finding, developing, and telling their own tales.

Canaan Street Meeting House | Canaan, NH

The largest river in New England rises in a small beaver pond near the Canadian border and flows over 400 miles through four states, falling 2,670 feet to the sea through America's only watershed-based national fish and wildlife refuge. Adair Mulligan leads an armchair tour of this great river in New Hampshire and Vermont, exploring its history and natural beauty through the seasons and among the communities that have sprung up along its banks. Next, the discussion will shift to how the river has influenced the lives of those who live there, and how they, in turn, have affected the river.

Holderness Free Library | Holderness, NH

Everyone knows that there's "something about lighthouses" that gives them broad appeal, but their vital role in our history and culture is little appreciated. Our early nation was built on maritime economy, and lighthouses were part of the system that made that possible. Due to automation, traditional lighthouse keeping is a way of life that has faded into the past. Jeremy D'Entremont tells the history of New England's historic and picturesque lighthouses primarily focusing on the colorful and dramatic stories of lighthouse keepers and their families.

Thursday, August 22, 2019

Rye Public Library | Rye, NH

There is treasure here but not the pirate kind. Scientific "digs" on Smuttynose Island are changing New England history. Archaeologist Nathan Hamilton has unearthed 300,000 artifacts to date on this largely uninhabited rock at the Isles of Shoals. Evidence proves prehistoric Native Americans hunted New Hampshire's only offshore islands 6,000 years ago. Hundreds of European fishermen split, salted, and dried valuable Atlantic cod here from the 1620s.

Saturday, August 24, 2019

Conway Public Library | Conway, NH

Abenaki history has been reduced to near-invisibility as a result of conquest, a conquering culture that placed little value on the Indian experience, and a strategy of self-preservation that required many Abenaki to go "underground," concealing their true identities for generations to avoid discrimination and persecution. Robert Goodby reveals archaeological evidence that shows their deep presence here, inches below the earth's surface.  

Sunday, August 25, 2019

Deering Community Church | Deering, NH

Oney Judge Staines, according to the Constitution, was only three-fifths of a person. To her masters, George and Martha Washington, she was merely "the girl." All she wanted was the freedom to control her own actions, but her account of escaping the Executive Mansion in Philadelphia, fleeing north and establishing a life in New Hampshire is not a typical runaway story.

Monday, August 26, 2019

Havenwood Auditorium | Concord, NH

One hundred years ago, a full generation before Rosie the Riveter, American women rolled up their sleeves and entered war industries where they had never been welcome before. They ran powerful machinery, learned new skills, and faced the sullen hostility of the men in the shops. In this illustrated lecture, historian Carrie Brown reveals their courage and their hard work, asks what impact "the Great War" had on their lives, and explores how these women helped shape the work that their more famous daughters would do in the next World War. 

Tuesday, August 27, 2019

Hopkinton Historical Society | Hopkinton, NH

This program is part of The Hopkinton Historical Society’s 2019 summer exhibit and series of programming, Changing Views: Relations Between Hopkinton's Early Settlers and Native Americans. The exhibit and programs will look at the history of Native American and Euro-colonial cultural clashes in Hopkinton, how the perception of Native Americans has changed, and examine both the differences between the two cultures and the connections to be made between their shared past.

Hopkinton Historical Society | Hopkinton, NH

Lynn Murphy, Abenaki elder, educator, and basket maker, presents a program on the ancient history and enduring presence of First Nations people. Her program traces their journey from a pre-contact subsistence lifestyle, emigration to Canada, assimilation with the White population in New England, into present day. (This talk was postponed from July 25.)

Meadow Wind Bed and Breakfast | Hebron, NH

Anyone who ever posted a Gone Fishin' sign on the door during business hours will appreciate this native fisherman's glimpse into the habits, rituals, and lore of some of the more colorful members of the not-so-exclusive "Liars' Club." Hal Lyon shares tales, secrets, folklore, and history of fishing in New Hampshire's big lakes especially Lake Winnipesaukee which translates into "Smile of the Great Spirit."

Thursday, August 29, 2019

Woodstock Town Office Building | North Woodstock, NH

Successful attorney--and father of eight--Nathaniel Peabody Rogers walked away from his Plymouth, NH, law practice in the 1830s for a dangerous and nearly unpaid gig editing a Concord-based anti-slavery newspaper, the Herald of Freedom. Plymouth State University historian Rebecca R. Noel tells the story of this feisty Granite State native, one of the so-called New Hampshire radicals. Rogers' dedication to abolition and racial inclusion took several forms in his relatively short life.

Meredith Public Library | Meredith, NH

Architectural historian Bryant Tolles, Jr. shares the history and architecture of the grand resort hotel phenomenon and hospitality tourism in the White Mountains of New Hampshire from the pre-Civil War era to the present. The primary focus is on the surviving grand resort hotels: The Mount Washington Resort, the Mountain View Grand, the Balsams, the Eagle Mountain House, and Wentworth Hall and Cottages. Extensive illustrations document these buildings and others no longer in existence. NOTE: This is a change of date from 9/22 to 9/29.

Saturday, August 31, 2019

Bath Public Library | Bath, NH

Everyone knows that there's "something about lighthouses" that gives them broad appeal, but their vital role in our history and culture is little appreciated. Our early nation was built on maritime economy, and lighthouses were part of the system that made that possible. Due to automation, traditional lighthouse keeping is a way of life that has faded into the past. Jeremy D'Entremont tells the history of New England's historic and picturesque lighthouses primarily focusing on the colorful and dramatic stories of lighthouse keepers and their families.