Welcome!

All the events listed in this calendar are funded in whole or part by New Hampshire Humanities, and all are free and open to the public unless otherwise noted. Many of these events are Humanities to Go programs your organization can book, made possible in part by generous support from
 

 

View a PDF of our quarterly publication, the Winter 2019-2020 issue of Engage!

For previous editions of our newsletter, click here.

Our Humanities to Go Catalog is available online.

 

 
New Hampshire Humanities programs are made possible in part by a grant from the National Endowment for the Humanities (NEH). Any views, findings, conclusions or recommendations expressed in this these programs do not necessarily represent those of the NEH or New Hampshire Humanities.

Thursday, January 23, 2020

Hanover Friends Meeting House | Hanover, NH

What is sustainability? And how has American literature shaped our understanding of this concept, in ways both surprising and disturbing? This interactive program begins with a discussion of current ideas about sustainability. Then, we will go back in time to examine Thomas Jefferson's vision of American agricultural abundance, which he contrasted with an overpopulated and under-resourced Europe.

Brookline Public Library | Brookline, NH

This program presents a brief history of the New Hampshire Presidential Primary, from its origins during the Progressive era of the early twentieth century, through its evolution to the most important step toward being elected President of the United States. Based around segments from the documentary "The Premier Primary, New Hampshire and Presidential Elections" this program focuses on several memorable moments such as Senator Muskie crying in front of the Union Leader office, and who paid for Ronald Reagan's microphone.

Saturday, January 25, 2020

Errol Town Hall | Errol, NH

This program looks at how dog sledding developed in New Hampshire and how the Chinook played a major role in this story. Explaining how man and his relationship with dogs won out over machines on several famous polar expeditions, Bob Cottrell covers the history of Arthur Walden and his Chinooks, the State Dog of New Hampshire. NOTE: Homemade soups will be available at the Errol Town Hall at 12pm with program to follow at 1pm.

Pembroke Town Library | Pembroke, NH

Why are we so fascinated with stone walls? Kevin Gardner, author of The Granite Kiss, explains how and why New England came to acquire its thousands of miles of stone walls, the ways in which they and other dry stone structures were built, how their styles emerged and changed over time and their significance to the famous New England landscape. Along the way, Kevin occupies himself building a miniature wall or walls on a tabletop, using tiny stones from a five-gallon bucket.

Sunday, January 26, 2020

Pinkerton Academy | Derry, NH

On January 26, 2020, the New Hampshire Institute for Civics Education will screen To Kill a Mockingbird as part of a multi-year statewide program designed to foster conversations with the public on law, justice, and civics. The screening and post-movie discussion will take place at Pinkerton Academy’s Stockbridge Theatre, Derry, New Hampshire, from 1:00 p.m. to 5:00 p.m. (program will begin promptly at 1:00 p.m.; please arrive by 12:30 p.m. to sign in).  Light snacks will be provided. 

Amherst Congregational Church Sanctuary | Amherst, NH

Drawing heavily on the repertoire of traditional singer Lena Bourne Fish (1873-1945) of Jaffrey and Temple, New Hampshire, Jeff Warner offers the songs and stories that, in the words of Carl Sandburg, tell us "where we came from and what brought us along." These ballads, love songs and comic pieces, reveal the experiences and emotions of daily life in the days before movies, sound recordings and, for some, books.

Tuesday, January 28, 2020

New Ipswich Library | New Ipswich, NH

The campaign for women's right to vote was a long one, from the 1848 Women's Rights Convention in Seneca Falls, New York to ratification of the 19th amendment in 1920. Who were the key players in New Hampshire and the nation? What issues and obstacles did they face? How did suffragists benefit from World War I in the final push for passage of the women's suffrage amendment? Who was left out when women got the right to vote? Using historic photos and documents, Liz Tentarelli will guide us on the journey.

Wednesday, January 29, 2020

Veterans Hall | Newbury, NH

The campaign for women's right to vote was a long one, from the 1848 Women's Rights Convention in Seneca Falls, New York to ratification of the 19th amendment in 1920. Who were the key players in New Hampshire and the nation? What issues and obstacles did they face? How did suffragists benefit from World War I in the final push for passage of the women's suffrage amendment? Who was left out when women got the right to vote? Using historic photos and documents, Liz Tentarelli will guide us on the journey.

Madbury Public Library | Madbury, NH

This program presents a brief history of the New Hampshire Presidential Primary, from its origins during the Progressive era of the early twentieth century, through its evolution to the most important step toward being elected President of the United States. Based around segments from the documentary "The Premier Primary, New Hampshire and Presidential Elections" this program focuses on several memorable moments such as Senator Muskie crying in front of the Union Leader office, and who paid for Ronald Reagan's microphone.