Welcome!

All the events listed in this calendar are funded in whole or part by New Hampshire Humanities, and all are free and open to the public unless otherwise noted. 

View a PDF of our quarterly publication, the Spring 2020 issue of Engage!

For previous editions of our newsletter, click here.

Our Humanities to Go Catalog is available online.

 

 
New Hampshire Humanities programs are made possible in part by a grant from the National Endowment for the Humanities (NEH). Any views, findings, conclusions or recommendations expressed in this these programs do not necessarily represent those of the NEH or New Hampshire Humanities.

Friday, September 4, 2020

Women have long been the subject of art, often depicted as nothing more than objects of desire. How do images of women change when women become the creators? In this Humanities to Go Online program hosted by Dr. Tricia Peone, Jane Oneail examines the history of women in art in brief and then explores the lives, careers and works of several major women artists from the Renaissance to the twentieth century. Artemisia Gentileschi, Mary Cassatt, and Frida Kahlo are some of the artists discussed in this program.

Tuesday, September 8, 2020

| Cornish, NH

NOTE: This program has been canceled.

| Haverhill, NH

NOTE: This program has been canceled.

| Bartlett, NH

NOTE: This program has been canceled.

Thursday, September 10, 2020

| Wolfeboro, NH

NOTE: This program has been canceled.

Virtual | New Boston, NH

THIS IS AN ONLINE PROGRAM: Whatever did New Englanders do on long winter evenings before cable, satellite and the internet? In the decades before and after the Civil War, our rural ancestors used to create neighborhood events to improve their minds. Community members male and female would compose and read aloud homegrown, handwritten literary "newspapers" full of keen verbal wit.

Saturday, September 12, 2020

This symposium explores how our collective history as well as societal and parental influence have impacted children's perceptions of themselves and others based solely on skin color. It also examines how these perceptions affect children's well-being and future roles in our changing society.

Sunday, September 13, 2020

| Wilmot, NH

NOTE: This program has been canceled.

Monday, September 14, 2020

Virtual | Concord, NH

THIS IS AN ONLINE PROGRAM: In 1787 delegates gathered in Philadelphia to address a wide variety of crises facing the young United States of America and produced a charter for a new government. In modern times, competing political and legal claims are frequently based on what those delegates intended. Mythology about the founders and their work at the 1787 Convention has obscured both fact and legitimate analysis of the events leading to the agreement called the Constitution.

Tuesday, September 15, 2020

Ideas on Tap returns on September 15th at 6 pm with “Voting in America: The Good, The Bad, and The Absent” in partnership with the New Hampshire Institute of Politics and the Grappone Center for the Humanities at Saint Anselm College. This free, online program will be moderated by Dr.

| New Hampton, NH

NOTE: This program has been canceled.

| Belmont, NH

NOTE: This program has been canceled.

Wednesday, September 16, 2020

| Conway, NH

NOTE: This program has been canceled.

Virtual | Amherst, NH

THIS IS AN ONLINE PROGRAM: The campaign for women's right to vote was a long one, from the 1848 Women's Rights Convention in Seneca Falls, New York to ratification of the 19th amendment in 1920. Who were the key players in New Hampshire and the nation? What issues and obstacles did they face? How did suffragists benefit from World War I in the final push for passage of the women's suffrage amendment? Who was left out when women got the right to vote? Using historic photos and documents, Liz Tentarelli will guide us on the journey.

| Freedom, NH

THIS IS AN ONLINE PROGRAM: Abenaki history has been reduced to near-invisibility as a result of conquest, a conquering culture that placed little value on the Indian experience, and a strategy of self-preservation that required many Abenaki to go "underground," concealing their true identities for generations to avoid discrimination and persecution. Robert Goodby reveals archaeological evidence that shows their deep presence here, inches below the earth's surface.

| Keene, NH

NOTE: This program has been canceled.

Thursday, September 17, 2020

| Tilton, NH

NOTE: This program has been canceled.

The NH Institute for Civics Education, in partnership with the Warren B. Rudman Center at UNH Franklin Pierce School of Law, presents a webinar featuring national civic education leaders Louise Dube (Executive Director, iCivics), and Ted McConnell (Senior Policy Advisor, CivXNow Coalition & Custodian, Campaign for the Civic Mission of Schools).

| Rochester, NH

NOTE: This program has been canceled.

| Chesterfield, NH

NOTE: This program has been canceled.

| Laconia, NH

NOTE: This program has been canceled.

| New Boston, NH

NOTE: This program has been canceled.

Friday, September 18, 2020

| Peterborough, NH

NOTE: This program has been canceled.

Saturday, September 19, 2020

This symposium explores how our collective history as well as societal and parental influence have impacted children's perceptions of

Tuesday, September 22, 2020

Virtual | Manchester, NH

THIS IS AN ONLINE PROGRAM: Following World War II, New Hampshire embarked on an extensive program of constructing new highways and improving existing roads to accommodate explosive growth in passenger vehicles and the need for better infrastructure to accommodate commercial traffic. Hundreds of millions in federal, state, and local tax dollars would be expended on this initiative over the second half of the 20th century and road construction would become an enduring part of the state's economy.

Folsom Tavern | Exeter, NH

"Open Questions" is a pilot series of thought-provoking community conversations presented by New Hampshire Humanities. This series explores essential questions about meaning and life that are important to Granite Staters. Each program is facilitated by philosophy professors who will explore essential questions about meaning and life. Open Questions: Does Truth Matter? is facilitated by Dr. Joshua Tepley.

| Stratham, NH

NOTE: This program has been canceled.

| Tuftonboro, NH

NOTE: This program has been canceled.

| Canterbury, NH

NOTE: This program has been canceled.

Wednesday, September 23, 2020

In the months since Breonna Taylor and George Floyd were killed by police officers in Louisville and Minneapolis, more than 25 million Americans have participated in Black Lives Matter protests in more than 4,000 cities and towns, in every state in the country. Millions more people have joined protests globally. By most accounts, Black Lives Matter is the largest social movement in U.S. history. This presentation will explore the founding of Black Lives Matter and discuss how today's movement grew out of the civil rights movement of the 1950s and 1960s. Presented by Dr.

Virtual | Bedford, NH

THIS IS AN ONLINE PROGRAM: Everyone knows that there's "something about lighthouses" that gives them broad appeal, but their vital role in our history and culture is little appreciated. Our early nation was built on maritime economy, and lighthouses were part of the system that made that possible. Due to automation, traditional lighthouse keeping is a way of life that has faded into the past.

| Grantham, NH

NOTE: This program has been canceled.

Thursday, September 24, 2020

The NH Institute for Civics Education, in partnership with the Warren B. Rudman Center at UNH Franklin Pierce School of Law, presents a webinar on the necessity civics education featuring Suzanne Spaulding (Senior Adviser, Homeland Security, International Security Program, Center for Strategic and International Studies Former Under Secretary for the Department of Homeland Security), and Elizabeth Rindskopf Parker (Board of Advisors of the Reiss Center on Law and Security at NYU School of Law Former General Counsel to the Central Intelligence Agency and the National Security Agency).

Hancock Town Library | Hancock, NH

In 1787 delegates gathered in Philadelphia to address a wide variety of crises facing the young United States of America and produced a charter for a new government. In modern times, competing political and legal claims are frequently based on what those delegates intended. Mythology about the founders and their work at the 1787 Convention has obscured both fact and legitimate analysis of the events leading to the agreement called the Constitution. Richard Hesse explores the cast of characters called "founders," the problems they faced, and the solutions they fashioned.

| Hampstead, NH

THIS IS AN ONLINE PROGRAM: The campaign for women's right to vote was a long one, from the 1848 Women's Rights Convention in Seneca Falls, New York to ratification of the 19th amendment in 1920. Who were the key players in New Hampshire and the nation? What issues and obstacles did they face? How did suffragists benefit from World War I in the final push for passage of the women's suffrage amendment? Who was left out when women got the right to vote? Using historic photos and documents, Liz Tentarelli will guide us on the journey.

Virtual | Chesterfield, NH

THIS IS AN ONLINE PROGRAM: Jennie Powers took a stand against social vices in New Hampshire and Vermont in the early twentieth century. She was a humane society agent in Keene from 1903-1936 and one of the first humane society agents to become a deputy sheriff in New Hampshire. Jennie was known across the country as "The Woman Who Dares" cited by the Boston Post newspaper in 1906 as having arrested more men than any other woman in America.

Sunday, September 27, 2020

| Easton, NH

NOTE: This program has been canceled.

Tuesday, September 29, 2020

Plainfield Town Hall | Plainfield, NH

Barns can tell us a great deal about the history of agriculture in New Hampshire. In the colonial period, New Hampshire was a rural, agrarian state and small subsistence farms dotted the landscape. An important part of these farmsteads was the barn, which housed animals and stored crops. Early barns used traditional building methods and followed the English barn style, with a low pitched roof and doors under the eaves. As time went on, the farms expanded to accommodate changes in agriculture.

Wednesday, September 30, 2020

| Bristol, NH

NOTE: This program has been canceled.