Welcome!

All the events listed in this calendar are funded in whole or part by New Hampshire Humanities, and all are free and open to the public unless otherwise noted. Many of these events are Humanities to Go programs your organization can book, made possible in part by generous support from

View a PDF of our most recent Calendar here (this newsletter will now be published quarterly and the next edition will be in September).

To view a printable calendar of Summer 2018 events, click here. (For previous editions of the Calendar, click here.)

Our Humanities to Go Catalog is available online!
Click here to view it as a flip book, or click here for PDF.

Tuesday, July 24, 2018

Meredith Public Library | Meredith, NH

This program offers a fun and engaging look at the historic and unusual weathervanes found on New Hampshire's churches, town halls, and other public buildings from earliest times down to the present. Highlighted by the visual presentation of a sampling of the vanes found throughout the state, Glenn Knoblock's program will trace the history of weathervanes, their practical use and interesting symbolism, as well as their varied types and methods of manufacture and evolution from practical weather instrument to architectural embellishment. PLEASE NOTE THE CHANGE IN DATE FROM JUNE 5TH. 

Kingston Community Library | Kingston, NH

Flight of Remembrance is the true story of the speaker's family before, during, and after World War II in Latvia, occupied Poland, and Germany. None were members of the Nazi Party or Hitler supporters, but Marina Kirsch's father and grandfather, both technically skilled, were forced to serve in the German military after fleeing from Latvia to Germany before the first Soviet takeover of the Baltic States.

Wednesday, July 25, 2018

Hill Library | Strafford, NH

Many Americans feel their privacy is threatened by information technology and favor stronger privacy legislation. At the same time, people support the use of information technology to serve them quickly and efficiently in various ways. In this program, Herman Tavani explores whether we can have it both ways and the serious ethical dilemma that arises if not. 

 

Lake Winnipesaukee Museum | Laconia, NH

Architectural historian Bryant Tolles, Jr. shares the history and architecture of the grand resort hotel phenomenon and hospitality tourism in the White Mountains of New Hampshire from the pre-Civil War era to the present. The primary focus is on the surviving grand resort hotels: The Mount Washington Resort, the Mountain View Grand, the Balsams, the Eagle Mountain House, and Wentworth Hall and Cottages. Extensive illustrations document these buildings and others no longer in existence.

Quincy Bog Nature Center | Rumney, NH

Through traditional music Jordan Tirrell-Wysocki relays some of the adventures, misadventures, and emotions experienced by Irish emigrants. The focus is on songs about leaving Ireland, sometimes focusing on the reasons for leaving (a man who is driven from his land by English persecution); sometimes revealing what happened upon arrival (an immigrant drafted into the Union army during the Civil War); and sometimes exploring the universal feeling of homesickness of a stranger in a strange land (a factory worker in London missing his home in County Clare).

Old Cheshire County Court House | Keene, NH

Michael Tougias takes the audience on a historic journey as the Colonists and Native Americans fought for control of New England from the Pilgrims' first arrival to the closing days of the French and Indian Wars. Using slides of maps, battle sites, roadside history, and period drawings, Tougias covers the Pequot War, King Philip's War, and the French and Indian Wars.  Strategies of the Natives and Colonial raids are all featured. These include Rogers Rangers' raid on the St.

Canaan Meeting House | Canaan, NH

New England's colonial meetinghouses embody an important yet little-known chapter in American history. Built mostly with tax money, they served as both places of worship and places for town meetings, and were the centers of life in colonial New England communities.  Using photographs of the few surviving "mint condition" meetinghouses as illustrations, Paul Wainwright tells the story of the society that built and used them, and the lasting impact they have had on American culture.  

Thursday, July 26, 2018

Mary E. Bartlett Memorial Library | Brentwood, NH

In 1837, teenaged Victoria ascended to the British throne, untrained and innocent. Those who would try to usurp her power underestimated this self-willed intelligent young woman whose mettle sustained her through her 63-year reign. Using Queen Victoria's diary and letters, this program reveals the personal details of a powerful yet humane woman, who took seriously her role as monarch in a time of great expansion. She and her husband, Albert, set an example of high moral character and dedication, a novelty in the royal house after generations of scandal.